• Batteries of all shapes and sizes

Alkaline Batteries

Alkaline batteries are the most commonly used Consumer type battery, most notably recognized in models such as AA, AAA, C, D and 9v. These batteries account for over 80% of manufactured batteries in the US totaling over 4.5 billion batteries. Alkaline batteries are used to electronic devices found in both the home and workplace. These batteries should not be thrown in the trash, but recycled due to alkaline batteries being classified as a Universal Waste and the numerous metals contained in each battery.

Lead Acid Batteries

Lead Acid batteries are most commonly found in automotive, marine, Uninterruptible Power Source systems (UPS), or various lighting systems where weight does not come into consideration for power storage. Combine that with their long shelf life and high storage capacity, Lead Acid batteries are widely used both by consumers and industry. Due to the high level of lead found in Lead Acid batteries, these batteries must always be recycled and never thrown in the trash.

Lead Acid Industrial Batteries

Lead Acid batteries are inexpensive compared to other industrial batteries making them ideal for stationary applications where weight is not crucial. Lead Acid Batteries range in size from a small car battery to batteries that weigh in excess of over 1000 pounds. Due to the high level of lead found in Lead Acid batteries, these batteries must always be recycled and never thrown in the trash.

Lithium (Non-Rechargeable) or Primary Lithium Batteries

Lead Acid batteries are inexpensive compared to other industrial batteries making them ideal for stationary applications where weight is not crucial. Lead Acid Batteries range in size from a small car battery to batteries that weigh in excess of over 1000 pounds.  Due to the high level of lead found in Lead Acid batteries, these batteries must always be recycled and never thrown in the trash.

Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) Consumer Batteries

Lithium-Ion batteries are most commonly known as the go-to choice for portable rechargeable batteries due to its high storage capacity with a relatively small footprint. Lithium-Ion batteries post a risk under certain conditions and pose even greater risk when used incorrectly. With safety always being a concern, we recommend bagging individually each Li-Ion battery before placing in The Battery Recycler container for recycling.

Lithium Ion Industrial Batteries

Li-Ion Batteries are also found throughout Industrial settings due to their higher storage capacity and increased discharge rate. Li-Ion Batteries are common with renewable energy such as solar and wind to assist in reducing a company’s carbon footprint and energy bill. Li-Ion batteries contain tremendous amounts of energy, and for that reason must be properly handled and stored. Due to the risk associated with these batteries, stringent regulation has been placed on storage, transportation and recycling of these batteries.

Nickel Cadmium (NiCad) Consumer Batteries

NiCad Batteries or better known as Nickel Cadmium Batteries, is a type of rechargeable battery once used in a variety of settings such as flashlights, portable power tools, and emergency lighting. However, due to innovation in battery technology such as Lithium Ion (Li-ion) and Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) batteries, along with environmental concerns, NiCad batteries are not as common any more.

Nickel Cadmium Industrial

NiCad batteries that are found throughout industrial applications differ from consumer type NiCad batteries in their size and free-flowing liquid electrolyte contained in each battery. Even though NiCad Industrial Batteries may be different from consumer NiCad Batteries, these batteries must be recycled.

Nickel-Metal Hydride Consumer Batteries

NiMH batteries, or better known as Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries can be found in laptops, cell phones, power tools, and rechargeable versions of AA, AAA, C and D alkaline batteries. NiMH quickly replaced NiCad due to environmental advantages and NiMH’s ability to hold 2-3 times the energy capacity of a similarly sized NiCad battery. NiMH batteries should be kept out of the trash and recycled due to nickel and an electrolyte found in each NiMH battery, that in large amounts is hazardous to the environment.

Start recycling your used batteries today


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